March 2011

Your own music show…

by Shore on March 31, 2011

KYUK volunteer, Andrew Simmons, hosts his own show, the Wednesday Evening Slow Down Show.

If you love music and are interested in sharing your knowledge and distinct style with our community, consider hosting your own music show! Perhaps you’d like to host a music request show? Or maybe you’re the right match for an R&B or jazz hour?

Excellent time slots are currently up for grabs, including Thursday evening and late Friday night. Training and support are available through KYUK to get you up and running.

Consider sharing your talents with KYUK’s listening audience. After all, it’s the local touch- and all of our volunteers’ contributions- that make KYUK special!

For more information or to obtain an application, please call me at 543-0228 or email Kristy@kyuk.org

The pool of nominees for this esteemed honor included 15 inspiring individuals this year. Ultimately, only three were selected: Neva Rivers an elder from Hooper Bay; Esther Green an elder from Bethel; and Peter Atchak of Bethel and President of the Bethel Search and Rescue.

The Tundra Womens Coaltion bestows the Yukegtaaraat award each year on people from the Y-K Delta they feel live a commitment to the values of peace, equality and community.

A banquet honoring Rivers, Green and Atchak will be held on April 30th at the Cultural Center in Bethel.

More tribes in the Y-K Delta are looking to their own people to resolve conflicts, through their own tribal courts. About 25 villages in the Y-K Delta now have their own courts. Leaders will meet in Bethel for training that will help them understand their increased authority after two major court victories against the State of Alaska.

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The largest pediatric association in the country says that children that have been potentially exposed to rabies need fewer shots, over less time, than is currently being practiced.

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The recent attempts by Congress to defund NPR through legislation like HR 1076, the bill to prohibit federal funds for NPR and to prohibit stations from using federal funds to acquire any radio content, may be  construed as attempts to “punish” NPR for its apparent liberal bias but more importantly  and less obviously they are attempts to defund the Corporation for Public Broadcasting or CPB.

CPB is the agency that disburses and manages federal funds for the 1100 plus public radio and television stations nationwide.  NPR gets very little of its funding through CPB and could most likely replace those federal dollars.  CPB, however, is required by statute to disburse the majority of the federal funds it receives directly to public stations.  Attempts to completely defund CPB will result in the defunding of many local public radio and television stations including KYUK.

To be clear, we realize that everyone has to make sacrifices in the effort to reduce the budget deficit looming over the country.  We know that this will mean reductions in the level of federal funding support for public media and the elimination of some federally funded public media programs.  We’re willing to do our part.  The total defunding of CPB, however, in an effort to “punish NPR”, for example, won’t help reduce the deficit in any significant way and will actually dismantle the public media system that has been in place for forty years, a network of local stations, like KYUK, that more than 170 million Americans rely on every day.

Our congressional delegation members have been strong supporters of public media in Alaska.  They have received the message from many of you that public media in Alaska, and your local public radio station, are important to you.

However, we still need to push the message home particularly to Senator Lisa Murkowski.  She still needs to hear from Alaskans that public broadcasting and your local public radio station, KYUK, are important enough to you for her to step forward in support of public broadcasting.  I urge you to call Senator Murkowski’s office at (202) 224-6665 today or visit her website to send an email to ask her to show bipartisan leadership on maintaining a level of federal funding for public broadcasting.

I will continue to update you on the progress of this effort to keep public media alive and well in Alaska.

Thank you for your support of KYUK, public media for the Yukon/Kuskokwim Delta.

Leif Albertson races to catch Jill Bruton during a broomball scrimmage on Pinky's pond. The Bethel Beavers prepare to travel to Homer this weekend for their state-wide debut. Photo by Kristy Newell.

Bethel broomball players have been practicing on Pinky’s pond for the past four years. Ten players will take their game to a new level this weekend where they’ll compete in a state-wide co-ed tournament in Homer.

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Bethel’s Tribe, the Orutsararmiut Native Council, has been partnering with the Venezuelan owned oil company CITGO to offer free heating fuel to Bethel households. Almost everyone with a pulse, and an oil tank, has been eligible in the past, but this year some major changes could affect who can get fuel.

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The University of Alaska Fairbanks is willing to pick-up most of the tab for Rural Alaskan students that want to pursue higher education degrees off-site.

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