Mike Martz

Horse Tribe, a new one-hour documentary premiering this November from Director/Producer Janet Kern, explores the renaissance of the legendary horse culture of the Nez Perce–with the help of a charismatic Navajo horseman, Rudy Shebala.

Shebala has an exceptional gift of equine expertise, but faces challenges in Idaho–a land far from his traditional Navajo home. His intuitive mentorship also guides at-risk teenagers to develop self-esteem through the strong medicine of horses. With his passion for Native American identity, he brings national attention to Nez Perce horse culture. However, Shebala’s personal demons ultimately imperil his accomplishments for the tribe.

Kern originally set out to the Nez Perce to portray children and society flourishing in the company of horses, and the adaption of an ancient equestrian tradition into one with a modern purpose. But as the story evolved over the years, it became more complex. A man was in crisis and a community was in conflict–leaving their beloved herd to an uncertain fate.

Horse Tribe is an epic story about the connection of human to animal, history to life, individuals to community, grief to resolve, and values to action. Through her own experience, Kern recounts, “The inexplicably generous instincts of a people who have experienced incomprehensible loss are a lesson, a mystery, and a gift to me and to everyone they touch.”

Horse Tribe received major funding from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB) and Vision Maker Media.  For viewing information in your area, please visit www.visionmakermedia.org/watch

About Vision Maker Media
Vision Maker Media shares Native stories with the world that represent the cultures, experiences, and values of American Indians and Alaska Natives. Founded in 1977, Vision Maker Media, a nonprofit 501(c)(3) which receives major funding from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, nurtures creativity for development of new projects, partnerships, and funding. Vision Maker Media is the premier source for quality Native American and Pacific Islander educational and home videos. All aspects of our programs encourage the involvement of young people to learn more about careers in the media–to be the next generation of storytellers. Located at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, we offer student employment and internships. For more information, visitwww.visionmakermedia.org.

We know that Amazon.com is perhaps the biggest and definitely the most widely known online shopping site.  It’s possible to find just about anything you can imagine at Amazon.com.  Piles of Amazon boxes pass through the Bethel post office every day.

Something less well known about Amazon is AmazonSmile.  AmazonSmile is a website operated by Amazon that gives customers access to the same products as on Amazon.com but with a difference.  When customers shop on AmazonSmile, the AmazonSmile Foundation will donate 0.5% of the price of eligible purchases to charities selected by customers from a list of close to a million non-profit organizations.   There is no cost to either customers or charities associated with this donation.  KYUK is on the list of eligible AmazonSmile charities under Bethel Broadcasting,  Inc., our corporate name.

If you value the mission of KYUK and are also an Amazon.com shopper, please consider visiting AmazonSmile the next time you shop online using this AmazonSmile Bethel Broadcasting Inc. link.  Amazon will make a 0.5% donation to KYUK from your eligible purchases at no additional cost to you.  It’s an easy way to show your support for public media in the YK Delta.

Thank you and happy Thanksgiving.

 

November Rememberances

by Mike Martz on November 6, 2014

Election Day has come and gone and we’re still uncertain about who our junior Sentator will be and who will be our governor and lieutenant governor.  At least the seemingly endless flood of campaign ads and flyers has come to an end so we can breathe a sigh of relief and turn our attention to other events and rememberances this November.

November is Native Amerian Heritage month.  This is an observance that resonates with us here in the YK Delta.  Check out the free movie screenings held this month at the cultural center in honor of Native American Heritage Month.  Cable subscribers could also check out First Nations Experience (FNX) on UATV on channel 12 of the GCI cable system.  FNX offers a wide variety of programs by  and about Native Americans across Canada, the US and even Alaska.

November 11th is Veterans Day.  This is a day to remember the sacrifices made by the members of our armed forces through out our history.  Alaska ranks among the states with very high veterans populations.   The YK Delta has many veterans of all armed services, the National Guard and the ATG.  Be sure to thank the veterans you know for their service and plan to attend the Veterans Day events here in Bethel or visit the veterans cemetery to pay your respects to our fallen heroes.

Friday November 21st is National Philanthropy Day.  This is a day to acknowledge, thank and celebrate those individuals and corporations that support non-profit organizations of all kinds through investments of cash, time and other resources.  The terms philanthropy and philanthropist often conjure up images of multimillionaires who start foundations or other charitable enterprises that have a national or global impact.  However, we are all  philanthropists when we step up and make a contribution of any type or size to a charity or non-profit we believe in supporting.

I want to close by thanking the philanthropists who chose to donate a portion of their Permanent Fund Dividend to KYUK.  Your contributions mean you believe in our public media mission and are willing to commit some of your financial resources to insure our mission continues into the future.

Thank you!

Vote On Tuesday November 4th

by Mike Martz on October 30, 2014

If you’re like me, you are very tired of the negative campaigning this election season and are looking forward to election day when the tidal wave of political ads on television, radio and in our mailboxes will finally end.

Don’t let the negativity of this election season keep you from going to the polls and exercising your right as a United States citizen to vote.

Every vote is important, especially this year when so many races are too close to call and the stakes, both nationally and for Alaska, are so high.  Your vote could be the one that decides the future direction of our nation and of our state.

No matter which candidate you support, no matter what your stand is on the ballot initiatives, be sure to make your voice heard.

Vote on Tuesday November 4th.

Once again we are humbled and so very grateful to all our loyal supporters for your continued confidence in the programs and public media services we have provided to you for over 40 years.

Thanks to your generosity we exceeded our  fundraising goal of $25,000.  We’re still assessing the final total but it has surpassed $35,000.  Thank You!

This level of financial support demonstrates that KYUK continues to be a trusted and valuable asset for the people of the YK region.  We will strive every day to earn the trust you have placed in us as a strong local source of news, information, education and entertainment.  Your support helps make it happen.  You are the public in public media.

Quyana caknak!

 

We are in the second week of our annual Fall fund drive and have passed $20,000 or our way to our goal of $25,000.  Thanks to everyone who has supported us with a pledge.  Your contributions insure that we can continue to provide the vital public media services you rely on every day.  Your support also allows us to bring you new programming and services.

I also want to thank the Bethel VFW Post for it’s $1,500 donation, GCI for its $5,000 donation, Alaska Airlines for their contribution of round trip tickets anywhere they fly and to all the local businesses who have contributed gifts to our thank you drawings.  These contributions are greatly appreciated.

There are great thank you gifts, hot drawings, a weekly drawing and our grand prize drawing still to come.  The Village Showdown is heating up, too.  Don’t miss out on your chance to win one or more of these exciting thank you gifts.   You can donate anytime by clicking on the Donate Button on our home page.

Thanks again for supporting KYUK, your local public media station.

 

 

The board of directors of Bethel Broadcasting, Inc. is proud to announce that Ashley Johnson of Bethel and Evan Petluska of Napaskiak are the recipients of the 2014 Alexie Isaac Memorial Scholarship.  They have each been awarded $1,000 for the 2014-2015 academic year.  Johnson is attending the University of Alaska, Fairbanks majoring in science with a business minor.  Petluska is attending Kuskokwim Campus-UAF in Bethel pursuing a BA degree in Rural Development.

The Alexie Isaac Memorial Scholarship was created in 2006, in memory of Isaac, a long-time employee of Bethel Broadcasting.   Alexie’s broadcasting career at KYUK spanned almost three decades.  During that time he directed news broadcasts and other programs from the KYUK television studio, videotaped countless hours of news footage, Yup’ik elders, Yup’ik dance performances and many other aspects of Yup’ik culture.  Alexie was an accomplished Yup’ik language translator and was often called upon to do translation work on KYUK radio programs including Yup’ik News and television productions.  He worked on KYUK television programs, series and documentaries as photographer, editor, reporter, translator, producer and director.

Bethel Broadcasting awards two $1,000 scholarships each academic year in his memory.

For more information about applying for the 2015 scholarship, visit www.kyuk.org or call 907-543-3131.  The application deadline is August 1, 2015.

Amount of Scholarship
$1,000/academic year (two scholarships awarded)

Availability
Annually in the Fall Term.

Minimum Academic Requirements
Graduation from an accredited high school or successful completion of an accredited General Educational Development (GED) program and acceptance into a recognized post-secondary institution.

Scholarship Criteria
Candidate must be pursuing a degree or certified course of study and have completed at least one year of study in an accredited junior/community college, college, university or professional trade school.  Graduate students are not eligible.

Candidates pursuing media studies, public relations, journalism, radio and/or television broadcasting, media technology and engineering or a related field such as marketing or business management as a major course of study are given priority.   Applications from Candidates pursuing major studies in other fields, such as education, rural development and health care,  may also be considered.

Candidates must be enrolled for a minimum of six credits per semester. Candidates must be residents of the KYUK-AM 640 service area. The location of their institution is immaterial. Candidates must demonstrate excellence in the following areas:
Academic Performance, Discipline, Attitude, and Attendance.

A copy of the most recent academic transcript must accompany the application.

Download Application

Application Information Sheet

Learn more about Alexie Isaac

(Lincoln, Neb.): Across the Creek, a new 30-minute documentary premiering this November from director/producer Jonny Cournoyer (Rosebud Sioux), explores the Lakota people’s struggle for the restoration of a cultural legacy. Broken by colonialism and with both the unbridled dreams and the painful reality of today, the film is a conversation between the elder and younger generations.
Faced with unfathomable challenges, Lakota peoples are taking steps to make a better life for their tribal members. A major initiative is to empower people who were once taught that Indian ways were inferior. In Across the Creek, everyday heroes are turning around this negative history by reclaiming stories, visions, and core values that once did effectively guide a healthy and productive tribal lifestyle. By looking at traditional family structure, spirituality, language, and values, they hope to build a sustaining vision for the future.

In Across the Creek, the land plays a major role. The screen fills with beautiful images of rolling plains, badlands, and Black Hills that are sacred to the Lakota. Ties to the land define the people, just as Lakota language allows them to fully express their worldviews and beliefs. Much of the effort to reclaim Lakota lifeways addresses tribal language and land in some way.

“It is a heavy shirt to wear,” explains Sage Fast Dog, who is striving to honor the role he has been asked to play in the lives of his students. A fairly new teacher who was drafted unexpectedly into teaching the Lakota language, Sage is not a fluent speaker and is learning many words right along with his middle-school students.

Sage’s mentor, the late Albert White Hat, is a Lakota studies icon. In his early days, he left the reservation in search of work, traveling from Denver to Los Angeles, barely scraping by at times–sometimes as a homeless person on the street. After returning to his homelands, he eventually was hired to teach Lakota culture by the same mission school that had denigrated it in his own boyhood. In addition to writing multiple books, White Hat later guided the Lakota Studies department at the reservation’s tribal college. He speaks in depth on the principles of traditional Lakota beliefs and values, the current state of the youth on the reservation, and his own hopes and visions for the future.

Sam Wounded Head, a medicine man whose first language is Lakota, speaks of his 50-year journey to find spiritual power. Sam’s wife, Norma, shares her memories of early life on the reservation and the importance family played in everyday life out in the country. The couple, now deceased, offer a moving glimpse of a generation whose window is closing.

Like others, Florentine Blue Thunder is convinced that Lakota language is the key to renewing a positive identity with the Native youth. Not only will it continue as a focus on both the educational and socioeconomic fronts, but in the context of daily life. If children can be raised in a nurturing, supportive environment as opposed to the negative reality that many face in high-poverty areas today, there can be personal healing.

Mike Prue is one such example. After spending his high school years in a blur of drugs and alcohol, even serving prison time for illegal drugs, he vowed to change his life. Mike began to embrace ceremonies and traditions. Today, he collaborates with medicine men who are still in their 20s. Similarly, Thunder Valley Community Development Corporation is engaging dozens if not scores of young people by authentically practicing culture. Nick Tilsen is a young leader who has found that–with a few visible examples of positive action–the most powerful strategy to healing is just “walking the talk.” Or put another way, “by crossing the creek.”

Across the Creek–which received major funding from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB) and Vision Maker Media–is an offering of PBS Plus. This half-hour documentary will be available to public television stations nationwide on Friday, October 31, 2014, with rights beginningSaturday, November 1, 2014. This program is suggested for scheduling for Native American Heritage Month. For viewing information in your area, please visit www.visionmakermedia.org/watch.

About Vision Maker Media
Vision Maker Media shares Native stories with the world that represent the cultures, experiences, and values of American Indians and Alaska Natives. Founded in 1977, Vision Maker Media, a nonprofit 501(c)(3) which receives major funding from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, nurtures creativity for development of new projects, partnerships, and funding. Vision Maker Media is the premier source for quality Native American and Pacific Islander educational and home videos. All aspects of our programs encourage the involvement of young people to learn more about careers in the media–to be the next generation of storytellers. Located at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, we offer student employment and internships. For more information, visitwww.visionmakermedia.org.

About PBS Plus
PBS Plus is an optional programming service for public television stations, providing fully underwritten series and specials. Over 99% of PBS stations subscribe to this service-reaching 100% national TV households. Annually, stations are provided with approximately 600 hours of programming.

Lincoln, Neb.: Spirit in Glass: Plateau Native Beadwork provides a rare opportunity to experience Plateau culture through the eyes and hearts of the artists themselves. Narrated by Nez Perce storyteller Nakia Williamson, the film focuses on bead artists from the Nez Perce, Umatilla, Warm Springs, and Yakama Reservations. The talented individuals behind this spectacular beadwork share their history, motivation, and the key role that beadwork plays in binding their culture together. This half-hour documentary from Mimbres Fever Productions and Vision Maker Media will air on Public Television stations nationwide with broadcast rights beginning October 24.

Truly an American story, the very essence of this art form and its story of survival is indeed a glimpse at the heartfelt tradition of a people. The documentary was filmed throughout the culturally rich northwest Plateau and mid-Columbia River regions with the mission of celebrating the Plateau People while respecting the vital role that their adaptability has played in their cultural diversity and maintaining of a tradition.

The beadwork tradition began to flourish during the restrictive times of the Reservation Period. Deeply rooted in the basketry traditions, skilled artists moved from geometric basket designs to floral motifs.

“Creativity and individuality is a shared Plateau cultural value. It is expressed in the woven flat bags and other artistic traditions,” commented Penny Phillips, director and producer of the film.

Adventurers, traders, and settlers began traveling through the area in the 1840s, bringing small glass beads in a variety of colors to trade for Native goods. Grandmothers started using beads as a medium to create and offer gifts to family members and trading partners, reinforcing traditional values while developing a new, artistic tradition. Beadwork became a way to show identity and to maintain culture.

One of the more memorable aspects of beadwork is the uniqueness of each beaded piece. For each beadwork creation holds special meaning for the person who made it and for the person for whom it was made.

“In the Indian way, when you give that special piece, it’s a way to heal your heart,” shared Rose Scott, a bead artist from the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs.

Pictorial beadwork is unique to the area. Since this style of beadwork started in a time of catastrophic upheaval, it serves as a metaphor for the vibrancy and survival of the Native culture. In order to keep their culture alive, the elders adapted by beading individual images and stories. And today, many artists have made a particular beadwork creation their specialty–as a contribution to their generation.

Spirit in Glass: Plateau Native Beadwork–which received major funding from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB) and Vision Maker Media–is an offering of the National Educational Telecommunications Association (NETA). This half-hour documentary will be available to public television stations nationwide on Friday, October 24, 2014. This program is suggested for scheduling for Native American Heritage Month. For viewing information in your area, please visitwww.visionmakermedia.org/watch.

Lincoln, Neb.: All-star filmmaking duo–Comanche producer and director Julianna Brannum and executive producer Johnny Depp (TranscendencePirates of the CaribbeanThe Lone Ranger)–bring the story of politically influential Native American leader LaDonna Harris to Public Television stations nationwide with broadcasts beginningNovember 1.
LaDonna Harris reshaped Indian Country both in America and abroad. A Comanche from Oklahoma, she helped convince the Nixon administration to return sacred land to the Taos Pueblo Indians of New Mexico, founded the Americans for Indian Opportunity in 1970, and became a vice-presidential nominee in 1980.

LaDonna Harris: Indian 101 is a reflection of her political achievements, personal struggles, and the events that led her to becoming a voice for Native people. Raised on a farm in Oklahoma during the Great Depression, LaDonna did not attend college. However, she studied and learned alongside her husband, Fred Harris, who would become a U.S. Senator. Upon his taking office, she too undertook a public service role.

LaDonna is best known for her work in U.S. civil rights when she set the tone with a landmark legislation initiative that returned land to the Taos Pueblo Tribe and Native tribes of Alaska. She also served a pivotal role in helping the Menominee Tribe regain their federal recognition.

Her trailblazing efforts began when President Lyndon B. Johnson selected her to educate both the executive and legislative branches of U.S. government on the unique relationship that American Indian tribes hold within our nation. This education course was affectionately called “Indian 101″ and was taught to members of Congress and other federal agencies for over 35 years.

La Donna Harris: Indian 101 is the first documentary about the Native activist and national civil rights leader, LaDonna Harris. Brannum commented, “LaDonna’s unique and bi-partisan approach to political and social issues made her a much-loved and well-respected icon in Washington. Not only was she a major force in Indian Country, but the media loved her and high-level politicians sought her input.”

Held in the highest regard by her colleagues for countless social and historical achievements, LaDonna is now passing her knowledge on to a new generation of emerging Indigenous leaders. With participation from students worldwide, LaDonna has created an educational program that trains Native professionals to incorporate their own tribes’ traditional values and perspectives into their work while building a global Indigenous coalition.

LaDonna Harris: Indian 101–which received major funding from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB) and Vision Maker Media–is an offering of PBS Plus. This one-hour documentary will be available to public television stations nationwide on Friday, October 31, 2014, with rights beginning November 1, 2014. This program is suggested for scheduling for Native American Heritage Month. For viewing information in your area, please visit www.visionmakermedia.org/watch.

About Vision Maker Media
Vision Maker Media shares Native stories with the world that represent the cultures, experiences, and values of American Indians and Alaska Natives. Founded in 1977, Vision Maker Media, a nonprofit 501(c)(3) which receives major funding from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, nurtures creativity for development of new projects, partnerships, and funding. Vision Maker Media is the premier source for quality Native American and Pacific Islander educational and home videos. All aspects of our programs encourage the involvement of young people to learn more about careers in the media–to be the next generation of storytellers. Located at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, we offer student employment and internships. For more information, visitwww.visionmakermedia.org.

About PBS Plus
PBS Plus is an optional programming service for public television stations, providing fully underwritten series and specials. Over 99% of PBS stations subscribe to this service-reaching 100% national TV households. Annually, stations are provided with approximately 600 hours of programming.