Manager’s Update

Vote On Tuesday November 4th

by Mike Martz on October 30, 2014

If you’re like me, you are very tired of the negative campaigning this election season and are looking forward to election day when the tidal wave of political ads on television, radio and in our mailboxes will finally end.

Don’t let the negativity of this election season keep you from going to the polls and exercising your right as a United States citizen to vote.

Every vote is important, especially this year when so many races are too close to call and the stakes, both nationally and for Alaska, are so high.  Your vote could be the one that decides the future direction of our nation and of our state.

No matter which candidate you support, no matter what your stand is on the ballot initiatives, be sure to make your voice heard.

Vote on Tuesday November 4th.

Once again we are humbled and so very grateful to all our loyal supporters for your continued confidence in the programs and public media services we have provided to you for over 40 years.

Thanks to your generosity we exceeded our  fundraising goal of $25,000.  We’re still assessing the final total but it has surpassed $35,000.  Thank You!

This level of financial support demonstrates that KYUK continues to be a trusted and valuable asset for the people of the YK region.  We will strive every day to earn the trust you have placed in us as a strong local source of news, information, education and entertainment.  Your support helps make it happen.  You are the public in public media.

Quyana caknak!

 

We are in the second week of our annual Fall fund drive and have passed $20,000 or our way to our goal of $25,000.  Thanks to everyone who has supported us with a pledge.  Your contributions insure that we can continue to provide the vital public media services you rely on every day.  Your support also allows us to bring you new programming and services.

I also want to thank the Bethel VFW Post for it’s $1,500 donation, GCI for its $5,000 donation, Alaska Airlines for their contribution of round trip tickets anywhere they fly and to all the local businesses who have contributed gifts to our thank you drawings.  These contributions are greatly appreciated.

There are great thank you gifts, hot drawings, a weekly drawing and our grand prize drawing still to come.  The Village Showdown is heating up, too.  Don’t miss out on your chance to win one or more of these exciting thank you gifts.   You can donate anytime by clicking on the Donate Button on our home page.

Thanks again for supporting KYUK, your local public media station.

 

 

As a new school year begins, I wanted to share with you an editorial from retired general Colin Powell and his wife Alma on the importance mentors can have in the lives of our young people, especially  those struggling with school and other problems.  General Powell speak very elequently about encouraging us all to learn more about how to help and get involved with our young people to help them graduate and lead fulfilling lives.

At-risk students need more help from us, not Washington

By Colin L. Powell, Alma J. Powell and Laysha Ward August 29, 2014

Colin L. Powell, a retired U.S. Army general and former secretary of state, was founding chairman of America’s Promise Alliance. Alma J. Powell is chair of the group’s board. Laysha Ward is president of community relations for Target, which sponsored the “Don’t Call Them Dropouts” report.

Nico Rodriguez was 15 years old when he found himself living on the streets of Lowell, Mass., with no plans for a high school diploma, no home to call his own and, seemingly, no future. Rodriguez was a statistic: one of the 20 percent of students who do not finish high school on time, if ever.

These pages often carry arguments for education reform, but despite the importance of issues such as Common Core and teacher tenure, bad policy isn’t what drove Rodriguez from school, nor is it the biggest problem facing most of the nation’s non-graduates. According to the most recent America’s Promise Alliance report, “Don’t Call Them Dropouts,” which surveyed 2,000 such young people from across the country, the reasons students leave school early are primarily environmental — including chronic absenteeism, homelessness, unsafe neighborhoods, negative role models and the need to be caregivers for parents and siblings.

What young people like Rodriguez need most is not necessarily more action in Washington but more action from us: caring adults willing to engage in a developmental relationship and the ability to help them imagine — and work toward — a better future. In a perfect world, this would be the role of every child’s parents, extended family and community of friends, but this is not a perfect world. Too many young people make it all the way through their teens without having known a single caring adult.

This month in Los Angeles, city schools superintendent John Deasy welcomed back his administrators with an assignment: Look under your chairs, and you’ll find the name of a struggling student. “Find that youth,” Deasy said. “Stay with him or her until graduation. We are absolutely our brothers’ or sisters’ keepers.”

The Los Angeles effort is an investment in our shared future, because the numbers affect us all. Right now in the United States, about 2.5 million people ages 16 to 24 don’t have high school degrees and are not enrolled in school. With no high school diploma, these young people will be lucky to end up in dead-end jobs.

According to the Alliance for Excellent Education, were the United States to convert enough non-graduates into graduates to reach a 90 percent high school graduation rate, it would result in an additional $8.1 billion in increased earnings every year. Non-graduates are disproportionately African American and Hispanic, presenting much more significant risk for the communities of color that will make up the U.S. majority by 2043. This is not a winning formula for the United States’ future.

If you want to change the world, start with a single child. Look at the difference one caring adult made in Rodriguez’s life. After leaving school, Rodriguez found a mentor at a local teen center. Sakieth “Sako” Long, the director of Youth Success at the United Teen Equality Center in Lowell and once also labeled “at risk,” took Rodriguez under his wing and connected him with resources so he could manage the chaos in his life and begin to make time for success in school. Long helped Rodriguez toward a better future, one in which he was thriving, earning and contributing.

Rodriguez was resilient. He completed high school and is working two jobs and training to be a chef. He has started mentoring other young people and is making plans to buy his own home and start a business. More than anything, Rodriguez wants to be for his 3-year-old daughter the caring parent he never had for himself.

Imagine that you have an envelope beneath your chair, containing the name of a child in need and within your reach. He or she is heading back to school now but is at risk of not finishing. There are students like this in every community across the country, just waiting for someone to connect with them.

This school year, we challenge you to find your Nico Rodriguez: Reach out directly to your local school, parent-teacher association or a relevant nonprofit with an offer to volunteer. Go to GradNation.org and use the volunteering tool to identify opportunities within your Zip code, or find out about opportunities as part of the Corporation for Public Broadcasting’s American Graduate Day on Sept. 27. Whatever path you choose, know that everybody can do something, starting today.

The young people you help are the promise for a strong, competitive and secure national — and, indeed, global — future. With our support, they can become leaders, teachers, scientists, engineers — and chefs. The question is: Do we have the courage and commitment to reach under our chairs and create that future?

The mission of KYUK:
We are dedicated to serving the rural Alaska and Alaska Native population of our region and responding to issues that affect the people of the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta. Our mission is to educate, stimulate and inform as well as provide cultural enrichment, entertainment, and opportunity for public access and language maintenance for cultural survival.

Following KYUK’s release of video of an officer-involved shooting in Bethel, there has been some discussion online and some people have asked why KYUK released the video.

A big part of KYUK public radio’s mission is “responding to issues that affect the people of the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta.” Certainly, an officer-involved shooting that took place in a populated neighborhood is such an issue.

We released video of the officer-involved shooting that took place on Friday, August 15th, after much deliberation of the possible impact to the community we serve, the police officers, and to the person who was shot.
In the end, we decided to release the video because we were in a position to provide a window on the facts in a neutral way that allows those viewing the recording to make their own judgments, based on the most complete information available to date.

In addition, we reached out to an immediate family member of the man who was shot and who approved of the release.

KYUK and all media organizations are in a new world where delivering raw information online, sometimes even before it is written and produced for radio or TV, is now possible. In this case, we simultaneously released a news story to accompany the video with as much clarifying information as possible to help people make sense of the situation which had occurred.

KYUK’s news department takes very seriously its obligation to provide accurate information to our listeners and followers in the community of Bethel, the Y-K Delta and beyond. We hope the information provided through our radio and online stories as well as other content, including the video, helps people make sense of the situation that has occurred and assists them in making informed decisions about the current state and future of our community.

The August 1st deadline for submitting applications for the Alexie Isaac Memorial Scholarship is only three weeks away.   If you are a collage student from any community within the KYUK listening area in the Yukon/Kuskokwim Delta,  including Bethel, apply now for an opportunity to receive $1,000 to use for tuition or other school related expenses.

If you know a college student from the YK Delta or Bethel encourage him or her to apply now.

The Bethel Broadcasting Inc board of directors will make the selections of scholarship winners at its September 27th board meeting.

The guidelines and application form can be found on the  Scholarship page of the KYUK website.  They can also be requested by calling 543-3131 between 8am and 5pm Monday through Friday.

Apply today!

THANK YOU!

by Mike Martz on April 29, 2014

To everyone here in Bethel, across the Yukon/Kuskokwim Delta and around our state, whether you gave to KYUK, Alaska Public Media or another public media outlet, thank you for contributing!  You are the reason we are still standing, strong, proud and in partnership with you to make our communities successful.

 

THANK YOU!

If you are a collage student from any community within the KYUK listening area in the Yukon/Kuskokwim Delta or Bethel apply now for the Alexie Isaac Memorial Scholarship.    If you know a college student from the YK Delta or Bethel encourage him or her to apply now.  College is expensive and the Alexie Isaac scholarship can help you pay for school.

Once again this year,  thanks to the generosity of our listeners during our Spring Fund Drive, we are able to offer three $1,000 scholarships.  That means three students will be eligible to receive a $1,000 for their school year’s expenses.

The Bethel Broadcasting Inc board of directors makes the selections of scholarship winners at the September board meeting.

The deadline to apply is August 1st and while that date may seem far away it’s only about four months from now and the time will fly by fast.

Information and application forms can be found on the  Scholarship page of the KYUK website.  The application forms can also be requested by calling 543-3131 between 8am and 5pm Monday through Friday.

Don’t delay, apply today!

 

As a thank you to the community for your continued support and listenership we are inviting everyone to our Open House event on Saturday April 5th from noon to 2pm here at the KYUK main studio building.  There will be family fun for all ages so be sure to bring the kids.

There will be ring toss and bean bag throw, cake walks, free popcorn, drinks and snacks.  We’ll have a Great Paper Airplane Competition with professional paper airplane folders to train your children to create the most aerodynamic airplanes possible.  Prizes will be awarded.  There will also be a Matchbox Car Grand Prix where kids will race the fastest matchbox car in their own collection in a bid to win toys and other prized.  KYUK volunteer Mark Osterman, host of  The Music You Live show, will have a request line taking and playing your song requests.

So mark your calendars for Saturday April 5th from noon to 2pm for KYUK’s Open House.  Meet our staff, see where all your favorite programs are produced and enjoy family friendly fun and games.

See you then!

Daysha-Eaton

Daysha Eaton, KYUK News Director. – Photo Courtesy Alaska Public Media

We’re pleased to introduce Daysha Eaton as KYUK’s news director,  taking over news room management and news reporting from Angela Denning-Barnes who moved to KFSK public radio in Petersburg in February. Daysha joined the news team of Ben Matheson, Charles Enoch and Julia Jimmie on March 24th. Regular news listeners have already heard her reporting on our noon news.

Daysha hails from the Port Townsend area of Washington State.  She had news broadcasting experience in the Pacific Northwest and then spent one year as a news reporter at KDLG Dillingham and two years as a reporter for KSKA and the Alaska Public Radio Network  (APRN) in Anchorage.  We’re excited to have her here to bring her reporting experience to the issues and topics of interest to all our listeners throughout the YK Delta.

We also want to welcome Charles Enoch to our news team.  Charles is from Tuntutuliak and started work as Yup’ik news reporter in mid February.  He’s quickly learning the skills and techniques of news reporting in both Yup’ik and English languages.  He’s already had two stories go statewide on APRN, one on the Bethel Winter House and one on the Manakotok VPSPO memorial.

Welcome to both Daysha and Charles.