TV

Starting April 2 on Public Television Stations–just in time for Earth Day–Walking in Two Worlds tells a story of division and redemption and demonstrates the possibility of healing both the forest and the Native community. Check your local listings.
Watch how worlds collide in the Tongass National Forest, the largest temperate rainforest on earth, when the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (ANCSA) turns tribes into corporations and sparks a lengthy logging frenzy.
Walking in Two Worlds journeys to the Tongass to reveal its splendor and shed light on the devastation and division resulting from the Settlement Act. The Tongass is rich with old-growth trees, salmon-filled rivers and wildlife. Alaska’s Tlingit and Haida Indian tribes have depended on this forest for their culture and survival.  The Settlement Act resulted from a massive collision of Washington bullying, big business and Native American naiveté. The result was a swath of tragic scars in a magnificent forest wilderness. Natives struggled to adapt to new roles as corporate shareholders.
For one Native brother and sister, this transition divided them. While the brother led the Native corporation’s clear-cut logging, his sister became a fierce leader in the battle to stop the destruction. Then a life-threatening illness drew them back together as one sibling offered the other a life-saving gift.

Vision Maker Media is pleased to offer Public Media Internships to undergraduate or graduate students. With major funding from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB), the purpose of the paid internships is to increase the opportunities for American Indian and Alaska Native youth in Public Broadcasting.

Location: Interns can be located at Vision Maker Media’s offices at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln in Lincoln, Nebraska, or at a Public Television station in the United States. Vision Maker Media will contact Public Television stations that are requested by interns to determine placement options.

Requirements:
1. Multimedia and/or transmedia experience in journalism, writing, video, audio, editing, public relations/marketing and/or websites.
2. Experience with social networking sites (Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Tumblr, blogs, etc.).
3. Be enrolled in a journalism, communications, or Native studies graduate or undergraduate program with a minimum 3.0 GPA.
4. Eligible applicants must be United States citizens or legal residents of the United States.
(For assistance: 402-472-3522 or visionmaker@unl.edu)
Deadline to apply is March 18th, 2016
Find the application here
Brent Sass is competing in the K300 for the second time this year. (Photo by Chris Pike/ KYUK)

Brent Sass is competing in the K300 for the second time this year. (Photo by Chris Pike/ KYUK)

The Kuskokwim 300 is a nearly 300-mile race that takes place on the icy Kuskokwim River every year.  

Brent Sass, dog musher and former Yukon Quest champion.

“We’re still sort of in the grieving process of that,” Sass said. “As everyone knows my start dog, and arguably my best dog died a couple of days ago. That’s been a big blow–Basin–missing him, and I don’t really know how me or my team will react to that.”
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Mushers, handlers and organizers attend the Kuskokwim 300 Musher's Hall meeting Jan 14. (Photo by Chris Pike/ KYUK)

Mushers, handlers and organizers attend the Kuskokwim 300 Musher’s Hall meeting Jan 14. (Photo by Chris Pike/ KYUK)

Twenty-five mushers, some local, some international–but all prepared to race this evening along icy river trails—are in Bethel for the Kuskokwim 300. The race starts tonight at 6:30 p.m. It’s the longest of three races that’ll take place over the weekend. 

Videos: Pre Race Interviews with defending champion Pete Kaiser and K300 rookie Brenda Mackey

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Later this month, Pope Francis will visit the United States.  During his visit, the Pope will canonize 18th century Spanish priest Junipero Serra, who founded the first nine Spanish Missions in California.  Serra traveled from his station in Mexico to bring Christianity to the Native population of California. The Pope has called Serra “the evangelizer of the West in the United States.”
However, the decision to raise Serra to sainthood has sparked controversy among California Indians. Historians speculate that Serra may have intended to convert California Indians, but the Spanish soldiers who populated the missions had other motives.
Many believe Serra allowed Spanish soldiers to commit atrocities against the Native peoples of California.    Soldiers administered corporal punishment and committed sexual assault against Natives.
Some see Serra as a saint, while others paint him the villain.   Saint explores both sides of the controversy.   This film was produced by Vision Maker Media’s intern, Charles Perry, as part of his multimedia internship with KVCR/FNX. Watch online

Grab is an intimate portrait of the little-documented Grab Day in the villages of the Laguna Pueblo Tribe, who annually throw water and food items from the rooftop of a home to people standing below them. A community-wide prayer of abundance, thanks and renewal, Grab Day exists at the intersection of traditional Native and contemporary Western cultures. Billy Luther’s film, which is narrated by Parker Posey, follows three families as they prepare for the annual event, chronicling their lives for the year leading up to this day.

Columbus Day Legacy examines the quintessential American issues of free speech and ethnic pride against the backdrop of the ongoing Columbus Day Parade controversy in Denver.

Since 1992, the 500th Anniversary of America’s “discovery” of America, the Italian-American community in Denver has publicly and wholeheartedly celebrated its revered holiday, much to the dismay of many local Native Americans. Columbus Day Legacy conveys the strong sense of community and cultural pride that both Italian Americans and Native Americans hold.

The history of the annual parade in Denver has been peppered with both verbal and physical violence, as well as numerous instances in which city leaders have had to reconcile issues of political correctness and freedom of assembly. Tensions rise as Denver’s Native American and Italian-American communities publicly fight over race, history and what it means to be an “American.”

Sesame Workshop, the nonprofit educational organization behind the Emmy Award-winning program, Sesame Street, and HBO, the nation’s leading premium cable network, today announced a new partnership that will make the next five seasons of the iconic series available on HBO and its multiplex channels, HBO GO, HBO On Demand and the new internet only SVOD service HBO NOW. As a key part of the deal, Sesame will be able to produce almost twice as much new content as previous seasons, and for the first time ever, make the show available free of charge to PBS and its member stations after a nine-month window.

“Our new partnership with HBO represents a true winning public-private partnership model,” said Jeffrey D. Dunn, Sesame Workshop’s CEO. “It provides Sesame Workshop with the critical funding it needs to be able to continue production of Sesame Street and secure its nonprofit mission of helping kids grow smarter, stronger and kinder; it gives HBO exclusive pay cable and SVOD access to the nation’s most important and historic educational programming; and it allows Sesame Street to continue to air on PBS and reach all children, as it has for the past 45 years.”

In addition to the next five seasons of Sesame Street, Sesame Workshop will produce a Sesame Street Muppet™ spinoff series, as well as develop a new original educational series for children. HBO has also licensed over 150 library episodes of Sesame Street. The new episodes will begin airing as early as late fall 2015, and HBO will be the exclusive, first-run subscription television distribution partner for Sesame Street and the new series. HBO will have the right to air all series in both English and Spanish. All new series will also be made available to PBS and its member stations after the first window. Episodes of Sesame Street will continue to be made available, uninterrupted, as part of the PBS KIDS service on PBS member stations.

“We are absolutely thrilled to help secure the future of Sesame Street and Sesame Workshop’s mission for the nation’s kids and families,” said Richard Plepler, Chairman and CEO of HBO, and Michael Lombardo, President, HBO Programming. “Home Box Office is committed to bringing the most groundbreaking and creative shows to its audience. Sesame Street is the most important preschool education program in the history of television. We are delighted to be a home for this extraordinary show, helping Sesame Street expand and build its franchise.”

“I’ve long admired the creative work of HBO and can’t think of a better partner to continue the quality of Sesame Street’s programming,” commented Joan Ganz Cooney, co-founder of Sesame Street. “Over the past decade, both the way in which children are consuming video and the economics of the children’s television production business have changed dramatically. In order to fund our nonprofit mission with a sustainable business model, Sesame Workshop must recognize these changes and adapt to the times.”

In addition to Sesame Street, HBO will also license approximately 50 past episodes of the two acclaimed children’s series Pinky Dinky Doo, an animated series for preschoolers that focuses on early literacy, and The Electric Company, which was rebooted in 2009, from Sesame Workshop.

About Sesame Workshop

Sesame Workshop is the nonprofit educational organization behind Sesame Street which reaches 156 million children across more than 150 countries. The Workshop’s mission is to help kids grow smarter, stronger and kinder. Delivered through a variety of platforms, including television programs, digital experiences, books and community engagement, its research-based programs are tailored to the needs of the communities and countries they serve. For more information, visit us at www.sesameworkshop.org.

About Home Box Office

Home Box Office, Inc. is the premium television programming subsidiary of Time Warner Inc. and the world’s most successful pay TV service, providing the two television services – HBO® and Cinemax® – to approximately 122 million subscribers worldwide. The services offer the popular subscription video-on-demand products HBO On Demand® and Cinemax On Demand®, as well as HBO GO® and MAX GO®, HD feeds and multiplex channels. HBO NOWSM, the network’s internet only premium streaming service, provides audiences with instant access to HBO’s acclaimed programming in the U.S. Internationally, HBO branded television networks, along with the subscription video-on-demand products HBO On Demand and HBO GO, bring HBO services to over 60 countries. HBO and Cinemax programming is sold into over 150 countries worldwide.

Join us for the fourth annual Webby Award-nominated PBS Online Film Festival. This year’s Festival features 25 short-form independent films from various station and producing partners.

Vision Maker Media is pleased to offer Jeffrey Palmer’s uplifting short film, Isabelle’s Garden–a story of a community coming together in reciprocity, through the hopes and dreams of a young, Choctaw girl and her garden. The short film was supported and launched through the Sundance Institute Short Film Challenge which aims to showcase stories that communicate how we can support one another to end poverty and hunger once and for all.

Stream the videos anytime from June 15 to July 17, and don’t forget to vote for your favorite videos, including Isabelle’s Garden. This week, ROKU users have an exclusive preview of the PBS Online Film Festival via the PBS ROKU app (http://www.pbs.org/roku/home). Beginning June 15, the Festival will be available via PBS digital platforms including PBS.orgYouTube, and PBS social media channels.

The PBS Online Film Festival showcases diverse films from the Center for Asian American Media (CAAM), Latino Public Broadcasting (LPB), National Black Programming Consortium (NBPC), Pacific Islanders in Communications (PIC), POV, StoryCorps, and Vision Maker Media, as well as PBS local member stations including Alaska Public Media, CET/ThinkTV (Cincinnati/Dayton), KLRU (Austin, Texas), KQED (San Francisco, California), Louisiana Public Broadcasting, Twin Cities Public Television, UNC-TV (North Carolina), and Vermont PBS. Promotional partners for the PBS Online Film Festival include ITVS and World Channel.

The Festival showcases powerful and engaging stories from filmmakers across the country, while also providing an opportunity for producers to reach and engage a digitally-savvy audience. The Festival has become a popular, annual online event–attracting more than 350,000 streams and 50,000 votes cast for the winner last year.

Viewers are encouraged to vote for their favorite film to win the “People’s Choice” Award. For updates on the Festival, follow #PBSolff on Twitter.

“PBS prides itself as the home for independent film, whether on-air or online,” said Ira Rubenstein, Senior Vice President and General Manager, PBS Digital. “With the Online Film Festival, PBS and its member stations have the opportunity to bring unique, high-quality independent film to a highly engaged, digitally savvy audience.”

About the Filmmaker: Jeffrey Palmer (Kiowa)
Jeffrey Palmer felt that this vignette, Isabelle’s Garden, about a Choctaw girl would not just shed light on conditions in the area, but also provide some insight; old traditions, it turns out, can help us create a better present and future.

The 1A Coastal Conference Basketball Tournament is one of the biggest events in the YK Delta. Students from the Lower Kuskokwim School Distrit capture that excitement as part of their career training.