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Tuesday June 13, is the regularly scheduled Bethel City Council meeting.
Christine Trudeau / KYUK

Tuesday’s regularly scheduled City Council meeting has a pretty long list of business to cover, but many of those items are on the consent agenda, which means that they’re up for a simple vote without a scheduled discussion. This could change for any particular item, however, should any Council member decide to pull it from the consent agenda for separate discussion.  

 

Friday, from noon to 4 p.m., and Saturday, from noon to 2 p.m., Bethel residents can bring their e-waste to AVCP container vans near Cezary’s Auto Body Shop on Front Street.
Christine Trudeau / KYUK

The Association of Village Council Presidents' Environmental Department has been trying to get ahead of the curve on recycling electronic waste - or e-waste - from Bethel for the past several years. That’s according to Ben Balivet, AVCP’s Environmental Manager.

 

For the past decade, the Coastal Villages Region Fund has offered youth internship programs over the summer. This year, 13 interns have been selected to work full-time with various CVRF Community Service Centers.

 

After last week’s meeting at Ayaprun School, KYUK spoke with the architect managing the school's new building project. This image was taken last year, one year after the Kilbuck fire that burnt down Ayaprun's original location.
Christine Trudeau / KYUK

After last week’s meeting at Ayaprun School, KYUK spoke with the architect managing the school's new building project. Chris Chiei said that he had a great many takeaways after speaking with the Ayaprun community.

 

“I think that overall, they want and they deserve a facility that is truly designed for how they have evolved to operate their program,” said Chiei. “The other is that they’re in a facility that truly reflects the uniqueness of the region and their culture.”

 

 

State controlled waters on the main stem of the Kuskokwim River from the Aniak to the Holitna, and the Holitna up to the headwaters will be open Monday, June 12 for subsistence fishing from 12 p.m. to 12 a.m.
Dave Cannon

State controlled waters on the main stem of the Kuskokwim River from the Aniak to the Holitna, will be open for 24 hours, starting at noon Monday, June 12, going until noon on Tuesday, June 13. From the Holitna up to headwaters will also be opening Monday for subsistence fishing starting at 12 p.m. and open until further notice. Drift or set gillnets at 6 inches or less, not exceeding 150 ft in length, may be used.

 

 

Today on Fish Talk we’re talking about the significance of salmon in Yup’ik culture since the first salmon opening is just around the corner on Monday, June 12.
Dave Cannon

Today on Fish Talk we’re talking about the significance of salmon in Yup’ik culture since the first salmon opening is just around the corner on Monday, June 12.

 

 


The opening for federally qualified subsistence users for king salmon will be from 12 p.m. to 12 a.m. on Monday, June 12.
Dave Cannon

This week, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service released a clarification for the Kuskokwim Salmon opening this Monday, June 12. Fish and Wildlife will be taking over management for king salmon on the Kuskokwim’s lower and mid-region up to Aniak. Other fisheries remain open for fish species other than king salmon.

 

The Bethel Planning Commission has held to their initial decision to turn down Steven Chung’s Tundra Liquor Cache application for a conditional use permit. Pictured here are Commission Member Jon Cochrane (left), Planning Director Ted Meyer (center), and
Christine Trudeau / KYUK

At last night’s Planning Commission meeting, Steven Chung’s Tundra Liquor Cache was turned down again for a conditional use permit. The Planning Commission discussion was a bit more a complicated this time around. The Commission couldn’t take opponents who gave testimony into consideration because it was an appeal and had to be based on evidence already taken when the Commission initially turned the application down.

Crooked Creek Fire Cools Down

Jun 9, 2017

Tundra fires continue burning in more than a dozen locations in Southwestern Alaska, but the fire of greatest concern is the Bell Creek Fire, which is burning in forest and brush close to Crooked Creek. A total of 61 firefighters and two helicopters have been assigned to the blaze, working out of a camp in Red Devil. They have been spreading hose lines to protect homes and other structures on the north edge of the village facing the fire, and also setting up a defensive line and dropping flame retardant.

Bell Creek Fire Nears Crooked Creek

Jun 9, 2017

More tundra fires are reported around Bethel, St. Mary's, and St. Michael's. A fire 22 miles east of Bethel is reported to be out, and firefighters demobilized. The Paiyun Creek Fire, 50 miles southeast of Bethel, has burned an estimated 1,200 acres.

The Allen Fire, 55 miles north of St. Mary's, is reported by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to have burned 1,500 acres. A firefighting crew was flown in to the Kogok River Fire south of St. Michael's; the fire is estimated at 632 acres. 

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