KYUK AM

Christine Trudeau

Reporter

Christine Trudeau is a radio and multimedia reporter, covering government and education.

 

She is a citizen of the Prairie Band Potawatomi Nation, in Mayetta, Kansas, and holds a BFA in Creative Writing from the Institute of American Indian Arts, located in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

 

Trudeau is a graduate of the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism. She is a former intern at NPR’s headquarters, for their Diversity Department. She has also freelanced with NPR, National Native News, Yes! Magazine and Native Peoples Magazine, and was also intern with NPR member station, KUNM in Albuquerque, New Mexico.

Native language experts are urging the state to declare a "linguistic emergency," and work with tribes to open a discussion about the endangerment of indigenous languages.
Katie Basile / KYUK

Native language experts are urging the state to declare a "linguistic emergency," and work with tribes to open a discussion about the endangerment of indigenous languages. In a report to both the legislature and Governor Walker, the Alaska Native Language Preservation and Advisory Council warned that most of the 20 indigenous languages recognized by the state are expected to go extinct by the end of the century.

The Tundra Women's Coalition's Thrift Store, in Bethel.
Paul Basile

The City of Bethel's push to enforce the sales tax ordinance on non-profit organizations continues to meet resistance. The current code says that while nonprofits are exempt from paying sales tax on items they purchase, they are still required to collect the tax on items they sell.

 

 


Grady Deaton (left) with the Kuskokwim Consortium Library, and Adrian Wagner (right) with 4-H Cooperative Extension have teamed up to train young people on how to preserve cultural histories by using the StoryCorps smartphone app in Bethel.
Christine Trudeau / KYUK

Bethel Community organizers want to train Y-K Delta youths to gather stories and traditional knowledge using the latest technology available on cell phones. Adrian Wagner with 4-H Cooperative Extension and Grady Deaton with the Kuskokwim Consortium Library have teamed up to train young people on how to use the StoryCorps smartphone app in Bethel. KYUK’s Education Reporter Christine Trudeau sat down with the pair after their first of three workshops with local youth at the Bethel Library. StoryCorps was formed years ago by public radio producer David Isay. Wagner and Deaton tell us more.

 

 

 

 

 


Mayor Richard Robb introduced a resolution Tuesday night to create a task force aiming at addressing alcohol related issues in Bethel and the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta. It passed.
Christine Trudeau / KYUK

 

 

At the request of the Association of Village Council Presidents, Mayor Richard Robb introduced a resolution Tuesday night to create a task force aiming at addressing alcohol related issues in Bethel and the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta; the resolution passed. The push for the task force started after Cezary Maczynski’s Kusko Liquor was awarded Bethel’s third and final package store liquor license by the Alcoholic Beverage Control Board last year.

 

 

Mayor Richard Robb and Council members passed a proclamation recognizing the Bethel Warriors’ Division II State Wrestling Championship title.
John Sargent / City of Bethel

To kick off Tuesday night’s Bethel City Council meeting, Mayor Richard Robb and Council members passed a proclamation recognizing the Bethel Warriors’ Division II State Wrestling Championship title.

The proposed Donlin Gold mine site in 2014.
Dean Swope / KYUK

State regulators are meeting in Aniak this evening to discuss the proposed terms of a permit for the Donlin Gold project’s water and waste management permits. It’s the first of three such meetings scheduled by the Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation. The other two will be in Bethel and Anchorage later this month.

Tribal delegates signed a treaty to form the Nunavut Alaska Provisional Government last August. This week, Akiak voted to formally join the new governing body.
Christine Trudeau / KYUK

It was a small turnout Monday, but the village of Akiak voted to support the creation of the Nunavut Alaska Provisional Government. The village is just one out of the 48 in the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta. Less than a fifth of the approximately 380 village residents voted. Of the 73 people who cast their votes Monday, 68 were in favor of forming a regional provisional government. That’s according to a release issued yesterday from the Akiak Native Community.

Rosalie Kalistook, General Manager of the Chefornak Village Corporation, standing next to her aunt's home just 12 feet from the shoreline. December 16, 2017.
Christine Trudeau / KYUK

This is not the first time this village has faced the threat of erosion and flooding, but relocating won’t be as easy as it was last time. KYUK continues its look at climate change and how Chefornak's villagers are facing the future.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  


District 38 Representative Zach Fansler stands in front of the village's Head Start building as he looks out onto Chefornak's eroding shoreline. December 15, 2017.
Christine Trudeau / KYUK

Villages like Newtok, Shishmaref, and Kivalina have become well known for being on the front line of climate change, but many other communities are facing erosion and flooding issues. State Representative Zach Fansler is looking at erosion issues in Yukon-Kuskokwim villages, and KYUK’s Christine Trudeau traveled to Chefornak with him. The following is the first of a two-part series.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


"Holes drilled across Kuskokuak Slough - waiting for the BSAR crew to insert willows with blue reflectors," said BSAR's Mark Leary.
Mark Leary / Bethel Search & Rescue

This past holiday weekend, Bethel Search and Rescue marked off the middle section of the Kuskokuak Slough trail. BSAR's Mark Leary says that after drilling holes into the ice, BSAR will attach blue reflectors to willow branches and then insert them into the holes.

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