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Arts & Culture

Stories about the art and culture.

The Piniiq Dancers, a troupe founded by BRHS' wrestling team, performed at the Cama-i Dance Festival for the first time on March 17, 2018.
Aleina Tanabe/KYUK

Students from throughout the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta danced at the Cama-i Dance Festival last weekend, including Bethel Regional High School’s very own wrestling team. They call themselves the Piniiq Dancers, and performing at Cama-i was one of their longtime goals.


Performing at the Cama-i Dance Festival 2018, the younger generation of Kasigluk dancers continue the village’s yuarq tradition. Picture taken March 16, 2018 at the 2018 Cama-i Dance Festival on March 16, 2018 in Bethel, Alaska.
Amara Freeman / KYUK

The 2018 Cama-i Dance Festival was dedicated to six elders from the tundra village of Kasigluk. The elders revived Yup’ik dance in the village and serve as the foundation of the community’s dance tradition today. The community is working to never need a revival again.


Photos: Cama-i 2018

Mar 19, 2018
Aleina Tanabe / KYUK

Didn't get a chance to see all of the wonderful performances during Cama-i 2018? Performers from near and far dazzled audiences all weekend long! Here are some photos showcasing the event. 

Check out photos taken by LKSD Multimedia Journalism students Roselyn Evan and Amara Freeman: https://flic.kr/s/aHsmgb6hJA

Starting at 6 p.m. on Friday, March 16 at Bethel Regional High School in classrooms C-22 and C-23, a men's and women's house qasgiq will be hosted by First Alaskans Institute, with Torin Jacobs [left] hosting the men's house and Andrea Sand
Christine Trudeau / KYUK

 

For the first time ever, this year's Cama-i Dance Festival will have traditional Yup'ik talking and healing circles for men and women on opening day. KYUK’s Christine Trudeau reports that the space will be ready tonight at Bethel Regional High School at 6 p.m.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


The Toksook Bay dance group performs at the 2016 Cama-i Festival in Bethel.
Dean Swope / KYUK

In the 1980s, a gathering of a few traditional village dance groups in Bethel started what may now be the world's largest gathering of Alaska Native dancers: the Cama-i Dance Festival. The elders that kept the drums pounding through the generations remain the roots of this tradition, and in less than two weeks the drums will beat again. KYUK sat down with two of the Cama-i organizers to discuss how this year’s festival honors its foundation.


Alissa Nadine Rogers will represent the Y-K Delta in this year's Mrs. Alaska pageant.
Teresa Cotsirilos/KYUK

Yukon-Kuksokwim Delta residents should keep an eye on the Mrs. Alaska United States pageant this year. In April, Bethel’s very own Alissa Nadine Rogers will represent her community and compete against women throughout the state. She hopes to use the pageant to advocate for a new resource management center in Bethel, where people from the region can come together to reconcile longstanding conflicts over wealth, land and resources.

Museum curator Ben Charles, NEA Chairman Jane Chu, and Alaska State Council on the Arts Chair Benjamin Brown tour the Bethel Cultural Center's museum.
Teresa Cotsirilos/KYUK

Federal and state officials made a whirlwind tour of Yukon-Kuskokwim culture last weekend. National Endowment for the Arts Chairman Jane Chu landed in Bethel on Saturday and spent the day trudging through the snow, looking at Yup'ik art.


Former KYUK General Manager John McDonald has begun the long process of organizing, cataloguing, and packing the KYUK 5,000-piece video collection for shipment to Anchorage where they'll be preserved. He is pictured here in the KYUK television studio on F
Anna Rose MacArthur / KYUK

Inside KYUK, tucked deep in the station, sits the world’s largest collection of videos documenting life in the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta. No one knows what all 5,000 tapes contain. The cataloguing is inconsistent, and the hours of footage are uncounted. But the station believes that it’s all important and is taking steps to save it.


When the Alaskan band Portugal. The Man won a Grammy for Best Pop Song on January 28, 2018, they gave a shout-out to Bethel and Alaska's indigenous people during their acceptance speech.
Screenshot

On Sunday, the band Portugal. The Man won Best Pop Song for its hit “Feel It Still.” Band members come from Wasilla and the Mat-Su Borough. Founding member Zach Carothers proudly claimed his Alaska roots in his acceptance speech.

Grady Deaton (left) with the Kuskokwim Consortium Library, and Adrian Wagner (right) with 4-H Cooperative Extension have teamed up to train young people on how to preserve cultural histories by using the StoryCorps smartphone app in Bethel.
Christine Trudeau / KYUK

Bethel Community organizers want to train Y-K Delta youths to gather stories and traditional knowledge using the latest technology available on cell phones. Adrian Wagner with 4-H Cooperative Extension and Grady Deaton with the Kuskokwim Consortium Library have teamed up to train young people on how to use the StoryCorps smartphone app in Bethel. KYUK’s Education Reporter Christine Trudeau sat down with the pair after their first of three workshops with local youth at the Bethel Library. StoryCorps was formed years ago by public radio producer David Isay. Wagner and Deaton tell us more.

 

 

 

 

 


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