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Last night, Bethel City Council voted in favor of transferring the city's current alcohol sales tax rate of 15 percent onto any alcohol shipped by freight into Bethel from outside city limits.
Christine Trudeau / KYUK

  

Last night, Bethel City Council voted in favor of transferring the city's current alcohol sales tax rate of 15 percent onto any alcohol shipped by freight into Bethel from outside city limits.

 

Infighting at the Calista Corporation has devolved into multiple lawsuits.
Teresa Cotsirilos/KYUK

The Calista Native Regional Corporation’s annual meeting was a lot more contentious than usual on Friday. Shareholders voted to maintain the corporation’s current leadership, but they also had a series of angry, pointed questions for its CEO.


Courtesy of the U.S. Dept. of the Interior

The new director for the Bureau of Indian Affairs Alaska Region is a Bethel-born Orutsararmiut Native Council Tribal member. Gene "Buzzy" Peltola Jr. has been named to the director position and will oversee the BIA offices in Anchorage and Fairbanks. Together, the offices provide services to 227 Alaska Native tribes.

The Bethel City Council will meet Tuesday night, and is set to vote on whether to transfer the city's current alcohol sales tax rate of 15 percent onto any alcohol shipped by freight into Bethel from outside the city limits.
Christine Trudeau / KYUK

  

The Bethel City Council will meet Tuesday night, and is set to vote on whether to transfer the city's current alcohol sales tax rate of 15 percent onto any alcohol shipped by freight into Bethel from outside the city limits. This would only take effect should Bethel vote under the state's "local option" law to return to damp status in the coming October election.

 

Calista shareholders voted in a tense annual meeting on July 6, 2018.
Thom Leonard Courtesy of the Calista Corporation.

The ongoing power struggle within Calista’s upper leadership reached a stalemate on Friday night. After hours of public comment at a particularly tense annual meeting, shareholders opted to maintain the Calista Regional Native Corporation’s current balance of power.


Calista shareholders attended the corporation's annual meeting on June 6, 2018.
Teresa Cotsirilos/KYUK

As shareholders arrived at Bethel’s high school gym on Friday afternoon, they said that they had some tough questions for their corporation’s leadership.


Bethel hasn’t been under a local option alcohol ban since 2015, when Bethel voted to make liquor licenses available in Bethel again.
Christine Trudeau / KYUK

  

Bethel hasn’t been under a local option alcohol ban since 2015, when Bethel voted to make liquor licenses available in Bethel again. With the local option petition submitted by Evon Waska Sr. and certified by the City Clerk’s office this past May, voters will see this question on the October 2 ballot:

 

The Calista Corporation's annual shareholders' meeting will be held at Bethel Regional High School on June 6, 2018.
Teresa Cotsirilos/KYUK

The Calista Regional Native Corporation is hosting its annual meeting on Friday. After months of name-calling and political infighting, shareholders will file into Bethel’s high school gym and decide who should lead their corporation. They couldn't be voting at a more pivotal time.

The proposed site for what could be one of the largest gold mines in the world: the Donlin mine.
Katie Basile / KYUK

Governor Bill Walker made headlines this past weekend after he requested that the Army Corps of Engineers suspend the Environmental Impact Statement for the controversial Pebble mine in Bristol Bay.

But Walker, who is running for re-election as an Independent, and three other top gubernatorial candidates have pledged support for the Donlin mine, which would be the one of the biggest gold mines in the world. Walker says that Donlin, so far, appears to be following the rules of regulatory process.

Tiffany Phillips filed a lawsuit against the Calista Corporation and CEO Andrew Guy on July 3, 2018.
Teresa Cotsirilos/KYUK

The Calista Regional Native Corporation is now involved in a second court case as its annual meeting approaches on Friday. Last month, the corporation sued its own former Board Chairman and requested an injunction to silence him. The judge dismissed that motion, but the lawsuit is still alive. Now, someone has sued Calista.

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